Oscar Wilde and a Game Called Murder: A Mystery (Oscar Wilde Mysteries)

Oscar Wilde and a Game Called Murder: A Mystery (Oscar Wilde Mysteries) - Gyles Brandreth This is a very structured mystery, complete with seating plans at two parallel dinners (beginning and end) and a grid. Nonetheless, it is not mechanical, and the motivations for the various murders and possible murders are driven by character, and though implausible, not impossible. The Wilde / Conan Doyle friendship - implausible in itself, given their wildly different characters - is very well drawn. The Marquis of Queensberry and his boxing rules have a large part to play in this one, and the Marquis himself does not come off at all well, though his sons do rather better - Drumlanrig, in particular, seeming like a rather nice if somewhat beleaguered young chap; Bosie is (doubtless accurately) described as being beautiful but indolent and selfish. I enjoyed, as always, Brandreth's deliberate wide range of eccentrics in late nineteenth-century London. Looking forward to the next in the series.