Oscar Wilde and the Dead Man's Smile: A Mystery (Oscar Wilde Mysteries)

Oscar Wilde and the Dead Man's Smile: A Mystery (Oscar Wilde Mysteries) - Gyles Brandreth I won't spoil the ending of this mystery, since it is quite ingenious. It's a classic double ending, the first seeming much too neat, and the true revelation coming years afterwards in the apparently irrelevant frame.

Loved the historical accuracy of it all, and especially the introduction of Arthur Conan Doyle, and of Robert Sherard as the narrator (at least for most of it). The latter gave some plausibility to the naive viewpoint in which we were led to the first ending. I had my doubts about Oscar Wilde as a detective, but Brandreth gave it a smooth plausibility, even though I am not entirely convinced that the real Oscar's penetrating powers of observation extended so far beyond his own circumference.

I nearly tagged this one "theatre history", as well, for its telling depiction of Paris theatre in the era of Bernhardt and Rollinat (which latter gentleman is put forward as the repository of the vices, including the Greek one in which Oscar has apparently not yet dabbled in this version of his history).